Posted by on Jul 1, 2014 in | 0 comments

On The Verge got off the mark with Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes at the Civil-War-era Bodley-Bullock House in Gratz Park.  In our site-specific staging, a small group of watchers experienced the machinations of the deliciously amoral Hubbard family virtually knee to knee and shoulder to shoulder with the actors, as they moved from room to room of  the 200 year old house. Before, during and after each show, complimentary hors d’oeuvres and desserts were served and fine wines and champagnes flowed, courtesy Lexington’s most high profile caterers, wine merchants, florists and musicians.

 

Cast:  Roger Leasor, Janet Scott, Joan Rue, Paul Thomas, Robert Parks Johnson, Kathryn Norman, Adam Fister, Brenda Crutcher and Haven Miller.

Director: Ave Lawyer.

PREVIEW

“It’s like a reality show of Tennessee Williams’ life”  by Rich Copley

Thus far, one of the most intriguing experiences in Lexington Theatre has been flying under the radar.

We’ll be writing more about On the Verge Productions’ staging of Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes, in a week or so at LexGo. But we dropped in on a rehearsal last week and thought we’d give you a heads up. Director Ave Lawyer is producing this play at the historic Bodley-Bullock House, but it’s not like they’re going to set up chairs in one room and let that be the stage. The action will move through the house, just like it does in the script.

Read more: http://copiousnotes.bloginky.com/2008/10/21/its-like-a-reality-show-of-tennessee-williams-life/

The Little Foxes’ at the Bodley-Bullock House

by Rich Copley

Voices from the past have filled the Bodley-Bullock House for the past few weeks, whispering and occasionally shouting about familial treachery.

This would be the right time of year for such spirits to arise in a nearly 200-year-old house, and people do say a ghost haunts the premises.

But more chatter floats to the high ceilings of the historic ­downtown Lexington house, which has been the home of a mayor and a general and even housed Union and Confederate troops at times during the Civil War.

These conversations are about props and costumes and scenes: The Bodley-Bullock House is now home to the inaugural performance by On the Verge Productions. That plot of family infighting and intrigue is the story of Lillian ­Hellman’s The Little Foxes, which the company is ­bringing to life on the first floor of the house. Each performance will play to a tiny audience that will move around the house as the action of the play changes rooms.  Read more: http://www.heraldleaderphoto.com/2008/10/31/the-little-foxes-at-the-bodley-bullock-house/#ixzz1IrUdyk1W

REVIEW

Little Foxes’ is engaging, worth many viewings

By Candace Chaney Contributing Theatre Critic

On any ordinary day, walking into Market Street’s Bodley-Bullock House is a little like walking back in time.

During the first week of November though, walking into the Bodley-Bullock House is like being suddenly and magically transported to the turn of the 20th century, with strong flavors of 19th century Southern aristocracy wafting throughout the house and out onto the back veranda, where you are greeted by a harpist, wine, hors d’oevres, and about 15 or so other guests.

After wine sipping and some genteel mingling, a period costumed guide appears and ferries the audience through the home’s front door and into the parlor for the opening performance of On the Verge Productions debut show, The Little Foxes.

Read more: http://www.kentucky.com/2008/11/03/579051/little-foxes-is-engaging-worth.html#ixzz0z33di2OB

Photos courtesy Haven Miller

Enduring thanks to The Junior League of Lexington, South Van Events, Liquor Barn, Michler Florists and Greenhouses, Geno’s Formal Affair, AccuPrint Printing and Publishing, APS Communications, Hinkle Studio. KCTC/Summerfest, Lee Thomas Photography, Transylvania University Theater, University of Kentucky Department of Theatre, University of Kentucky Opera Theatre, Woodford County Theater

A portion of the proceeds of this production, hosted by the Sustainer Group of The Junior League of Lexington, was donated to the upkeep of the Bodley-Bullock House.